Newsletter #2 April 2009

C&B article Top 3 Science paper in Environmental Science and Technology in 2008


img C&BAn article published by Department of Chemistry & Biology (C&B) researchers Thijs van Boxtel, Jorke Kamstra, Peter Cenijn and Juliette Legler was selected by the renowned journal Environmental Science and Technology (ES&T) for the ES&T Second Runner-up Award - Science for the best papers in 2008 for "Microarray analysis reveals a mechanism of phenolic PBDE toxicity in zebrafish". ES&T received 3600 manuscripts and published over 1400 papers in 2008, and this paper was judged to be among the very best. Read further for an interview with Thijs van Boxtel and Juliette Legler on the background leading to this paper, as well as a link to the pdf version.

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Economic impacts of the EU ETS: preliminary evidence


img_EEEmissions trading has long been advocated by economists as a cost-effective instrument to reduce emissions. The European greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme (EU ETS) puts the theory to the test. Does the scheme live up to its expectations? We compare expectations of the first phase of the EU ETS with observed results.

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The Biomass Dialogue: structuring the complex bio-energy issue


img epaHow should the sustainability of biomass chains be assessed, evaluated and monitored? Can biomass chains be set-up in such a way that they do not negatively affect, but rather benefit developing countries? What kind of policies should be in place to develop sustainable biomass applications?

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Anthropogenic ocean acidification


spaceBesides global warming, increased GHG concentrations in the earth's atmosphere also make the surface ocean slightly more acidic. While the exact consequences of this ocean acidification are not well known, they may have disastrous effects for marine ecosystems. The first signs that shell forming marine plankton is being affected are starting to emerge now and future projections suggest that anthropogenic ocean acidification may become more severe than ever during the last 300 million years.

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