No 4 December 2011

The Amsterdam Global Change Institute: a next step for IVM


fransberkhoutIn October, the Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM) celebrated its
40th anniversary with a day of reflection and story-telling by past and current members of the institute. From a small group of natural and social scientists brought together by the regional economist Jan Lambooy in 1971, the institute has grown into a vibrant and diverse community of researchers and teachers.

Read more  
streep

New book on coastal cities and management of flood risk


ee_boekJeroen Aerts, Wouter Botzen and Philip Ward of the Institute for Environmental studies (IVM), of the VU University Amsterdam have published a new book entitled “Climate adaptation and flood risk in Coastal Cities”. The book was presented to Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte at the Dutch Delta Conference.

Read morestreep

Market power in water markets


waterMarket power is an important source of friction in water markets. Owners
of a water supply project have an incentive to reduce deliveries in order to
increase the water price at the destination market. In this study we provide
an economic model to assess the effects of market power in water markets.

Read more
streep

Biodiversity protection and livelihoods: discourse and reality.


indiaThe international conversation about biodiversity increasingly emphasizes synergies between biodiversity conservation and the improvement of local livelihoods. In line with this, there is much advocacy of co-management and the meaningful participation of local communities in government decisions about protected areas. But is it true that local communities are invited to play a role in policy making, and if so can actually play such a role? Is it true that local communities, and especially the poor members of such communities, benefit from biodiversity conservation?

Read morestreep

A chemical journey through food webs: Improving predictions of bioaccumulation patterns.


cb_vissenA recent study by IVM researchers in cooperation with Prof. Frank Gobas of Simon Fraser University in Vancouver, Canada has closely examined the relationship of laboratory-derived BCF data to the actual bioaccumulation observed in a real-life food web. The overall bioaccumulation in food webs can be expressed with the 'trophic magnification factor' (TMF). The Western Scheldt Estuary served as the study area, where benthic and pelagic food chains, sediment, water and suspended particulate matter were sampled and chemically analysed.

Read more

streep